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Dental Implant Claim

No Win No Fee Implant Claims

A Dental claim is complicated. A dental implant claim can be even more complex. The first thing to note is how the implants have failed. Was it failure to osseo-integrate? Could it be that there was underlying bone or gum disease (periodontal disease)? Perhaps there was a failure in technique or in siting the implant? The next issue is: what can be done about it? Can the implant be refitted or must the patient look elsewhere for orthodontic devices such as bridgework or denture plates. It could be that this was never a case for implants in the first place? Call us to discuss your situation, it genuinely will not take long and we can get to grips with the situation you face and the way out of it.

Implants are a great way to restore a smile and improve someones confidence. However, should they be fitted badly, nerve damage and injury to the patient is a real danger. It can lead to behavioural adjusmnets that can over time result in an individual becoming withdrawn, antisocial and depressed.  

There are a lot of solicitors out there offering no win no fee agreements for dental implant claims.  Our members agree that a 20% deduction applies only if you win and never anything more. If you lose, then there is nothing to pay at all ever. Nobody out there that we know of offers a better deal. 

The Perfect Smile or a Dental Implant Claim?

A Free Chat with a Dental Implant Solicitor

Completely Free Advice Regarding your Options

Free Dental Implant Claim Viability Assessment

No Win No Fee Claims

Tel 01904-914-989

Email Info@law-med.co.uk

What Are Dental Implants?

Dental implants as they are recognised now were invented in 1952 by a Swedish surgeon named Per-Ingvar Brånemark. Today, they are considered the highest standard of care for prosthetic replacement of missing teeth in dentistry. Essentially a dental implant is a surgical fixture that is placed into the jawbone and allowed to fuse with the bones structure. The dental implant then acts as a replacement for the root of a missing tooth. In turn, this “artificial tooth root” serves to hold a replacement tooth or bridge (a crown). Having a dental implant fused to the jawbone is the closest thing to mimicking a natural tooth because it stands on its own without affecting the nearby teeth and has great stability. The process of fusion between the dental implant and jawbone is called “osseointegration.” Most dental implants today are made of titanium, which allows them to integrate with bone without being recognized as a foreign object in our body.

So we can say that dental implants are replacement tooth roots made of titanium. Implants provide a strong foundation for fixed (permanent) or removable replacement teeth that are made to match your natural teeth. Instead of individual crowns, some patients may have attachments on their implant that support a removable denture.

Why have dental Implants fitted?

Dental implants can be used to replace a single tooth, several teeth, or all of the teeth. The goal of teeth replacement in dentistry is to restore function as well as aesthetics. When it comes to tooth replacement, generally, there are three options:

  1. removable dental appliance (complete denture or partial denture),
  2. fixed dental bridge (cemented), and
  3. dental implant.

Dentures are the more affordable option for replacement teeth but are the least desirable because of the inconvenience of a removable appliance in the mouth. Furthermore, dentures can affect one’s taste and sensory experience with food. They are gradually becoming extinct as a treatment but at present they are still in use. Dental bridgework was the more common restorative option prior to the relatively recent shift to dental implant treatment. The main disadvantage to bridgework is the dependence on existing natural teeth for support. Implants are supported by bone only and do not affect surrounding natural teeth. Deciding on which option to choose depends on many factors. Specifically for dental implants, these factors include:

  1. location of missing tooth or teeth,
  2. quantity and quality of the jawbone where the dental implant is to be placed,
  3. health of the patient,
  4. cost, and patient preference.

A dental surgeon examines the area to be considered for the dental implant and makes a clinical assessment of whether the patient is a good candidate for a dental implant. There are great advantages to choosing a dental implant for tooth replacement over the other options. Dental implants are conservative in that missing teeth can be replaced without affecting or altering the adjacent teeth. Furthermore, because dental implants integrate into the bone structure, they are very stable and can have the look and feel of one’s own natural teeth.

For Dental Implant Claims

Info@law-med.co.uk


Historically, there have been two different types of dental implant. These are endosteal and subperiosteal. Endosteal refers to an implant that is “in the bone,” and subperiosteal refers to an implant that rests on top of the jawbone under the gum tissue. Subperiosteal implants are no longer in use today because of their poor long-term results in comparison to endosteal dental implants.

​While the primary function of dental implants is for teeth replacement, there are areas in which implants can assist in other dental procedures. Due to their stability, dental implants can be used to support a removable denture and provide a more secure and comfortable fit. In addition, for orthodontics procedures, dental mini-implants can act as temporary anchorage devices (TAD) to help move teeth to a desired position. These mini-implants are small and temporarily fixed to bone while assisting in anchorage for teeth movement. They are subsequently removed after their function has been served.

Implant Technology is rapidly developing and new techniques and devices appear almost every day…

For patients who have lost all their teeth due to decay or gum disease of the upper and/or lower arch, an option is available to provide a very stable and comfortable prosthesis using a minimal number of implants. One such is example is the “All-On-4” technique that was named by implant manufacturer Nobel Biocare. This technique gets its name from the idea that four implants can be used to replace all teeth in a single arch (upper or lower).

The implants are strategically placed in areas of good strong bone, and a thin denture prosthesis is screwed into place. The All-On-4 technique provides teeth replacement that is stable (not removable) and feels like natural teeth compared to the older method of traditional (removable) complete dentures. Without a doubt, implant dentistry has allowed for more treatment options to replace single and multiple missing teeth with long-term stability and contributes to improved oral health.

What Type of Dental Implants are there?

The technological advances in cosmetic dentistry are constantly evolving. Digitally designed dentures, augmented reality
Robotic Dental Implant Surgery and 3D Printing are all making thier mark on 21st century facial aesthetics.
  1. Free Chat with a Fully Qualified Panel Dental Solicitor
  2. Free Advice Session Regarding your Options
  3. Free Claims Viability Assessment
  4. No Win No Fee Claims
  5. Tel 01904-914-989
  6. Email Info@law-med.co.uk

What can lead to a Dental Implant Claim?

With any surgery, there are always some risks and potential complications to the patient or to the success of a dental implant. Careful planning is important to ensure that a patient is healthy enough to undergo oral surgery and heal properly. Just like any oral surgery procedure, bleeding disorders, infections, allergies, existing medical conditions, and medications need careful review prior to proceeding with treatment. Fortunately, the success rate is quite high and failures usually occur in the unlikely event of infection, fracture of the dental implant, overloading of the dental implant, damage to the surrounding area (nerves, blood vessels, teeth), poor positioning of the dental implant, or poor bone quantity or quality. Again, careful planning with a qualified surgeon can help avoid these problems. In many cases, another attempt can be made to replace a failed dental implant after the requisite time for healing has taken place.

What is a Dental Implant Claim Worth?

A lot more than you realise. The cost is not just the refund on the implant / implants, nor is it just the costs of the implant and an amount for the injury of having them badly fitted. It is all those things plus the future replacement costs of having crowns placed on the implants every 10-15 years until you die. Of course that depends on the circumstances of the implants but it is a factor in many claims where bone loss has made future placements impossible. A simple implant on a twenty-something woman could be refunded at £3k but then the injury may well be twice that and she could be looking at £6K in future treatment costs. For each implant of course the costs rises. There is no set amount here, so it is essential to be circumspect and also to ensure you get the right lawyer.  A dental implant claim has a great many future losses to consider.

  1. Free Chat with a Fully Qualified Panel Dental Solicitor
  2. Free Advice Session Regarding your Options
  3. Free Claims Viability Assessment
  4. No Win No Fee Claims
  5. Tel 01904-914-989
  6. Email Info@law-med.co.uk

A large branch of facial nerve fibers lay beneath the line of teeth in your lower jaw and other nerve fiber’s are also present in the upper jaw. A good dentist will thoroughly investigate the position of these nerves before attempting to place a implant. However, radiology can sometimes trip up the unwary or negligent dentist and regrettably the resulting nerve damage can occur.  It is inevitable that a dental implant claim will follow.

Nerve damage is every patients worst nightmare – often the advice and actions taken immediately are of the utmost importance.

In 99 % of cases this damage self heals in a few weeks or even months. However, in some cases the damage is permanent and simply cannot be repaired. This can lead to facial paralysis, drooling speech difficulty and even a chocking hazard. Needless to say such litigation is complex, long and difficult to navigate, these are claims for specialists and not for dabblers and they have issues of complex law and causation issues behind them. Do not waste time with an ordinary solicitor who does a bit of everything instruct a specialist. 

Dental Implants and Nerve Damage

A loss of sensation in the tongue or face is not just an inconvienience. It may effect the way the face is shaped, how you speak and eat and in the long term how you come to view yourself.
https://videos.files.wordpress.com/L7mYhBTV/version2-2_hd.mp4

Funding Your Dental Claim

Law Med Solicitors unique no win no fee agreement is industry beating for client fairness, and transparancy

Nursing Negligence Example

Some examples of nursing negligence would be:

  • Failing to refer a patient who is suffering from an open wound or pressure sore that is not healing.
  • Failing to gaurd against pressure sores, ulcers and weeping wounds.
  • Failing to lift a patient safely leading to fractured bones which can go unnoticed or untreated
  • Keeping a patient on antibiotics for a urinary tract infection when the infection is not responding.
  • Not keeping a patient hydrated or not noticing that a patient is dehydrated or undernourished.
  • Administering the wrong medication or the wrong dose.
  • Not reffering a patient who is not responding to medication
  • Not taking a patients consent or ignoring a patients wishes
Nursing Negligence Consequences

The consequence of negligence for the patient is nearly always injury or harm, for the responsible nurse the consequences vary but could be:

  • The Nurse will likley have to be questioned and a statment taken by the Hospitals legal department.
  • The Nurse will likely have to given an account to thier manager or supervisor
  • They may face and investigation by the NHS Trust or the Hospital.
  • They may have to face an investigation by the Royal College of Nursing and Midwifery.
  • They may have no conseqeunces at all.

Ultimately much depends on the degree of negligence or harm that has been caused.

Nurse Negligence Wrongful Death

FATAL ACCIDENT INQUIRY INTO THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE DEATH OF MR JAMES MCNEILL [2010] FAI 50

DESCRIPTION

In terms of section 6(1)(a) of the Fatal Accidents and Sudden Deaths Inquiry (Scotland) Act 1976, the Sheriff found that Mr James McNeil (DOB 14th September 1935) died at 08:30 hours on the 22nd of October 2008 at Belhaven Hospital, Dunbar. The cause of death was (i) bronchopneumonia; (ii) pressure sores on back, ischemic heart disease, and dementia.In 1989, Mr McNeill was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, and his condition eventually deteriorated in 2007. On 18th April 2008 Mr McNeill was admitted to Lennel House Nursing Home, Coldstream; Lennel House was a nursing home owned and operated by Guardian Care Homes (UK) Ltd. On admission to Lennel House an Admission Assessment Form was completed by the duty staff nurse. The assessment covered, inter alia, the risk of pressure sores; Mr McNeill was assessed as being at high risk of developing pressure sores.


On 19th May 2008 two blood blisters were noticed on Mr McNeill’s sacral cleft. These were the first manifestations of the early stages of pressure sores. In the course of the following days the blisters were treated with creams and dressings. However, the area of the wound, which was measured and recorded daily, increased. By 30th May 2008 the blisters measured 3 x 1.5cm and 1 x 1cm and were recorded as being necrotic and producing an odour, signs consistent with infection. By 9th June 2008 the measures put in place produced no improvement and the odour from the wound was now described as offensive. On 11th June 2008 the districtnurse visited Lennel House by prior arrangement. The wound now measured 13 x 4.5cm and was discharging thick yellow puss. A hole had appeared in the sacral cleft from which fluid leaked. The districtnurse arranged for Mr McNeill to be examined by a GP which examination was conducted on 12th June 2008. As a result of this examination the GP arranged for Mr McNeill to be admitted to the Borders General Hospital on 12th June 2008 in order to obtain a surgical opinion.

On 13th June 2008 surgical debridement of Mr McNeill’s pressure sore wound was carried out. The operating surgeon considered the wound to be serious and described the operation as a “planned emergency”. In his experience of having carried out 12 or so pressure sore debridements over the years, this was described as the worst which he had encountered.Mr McNeill remained at Borders General Hospital until 24th September 2008 when he was transferred to Roodlands Hospital, Haddington. On 20th October 2008 Mr McNeill was transferred to Belhaven Hospital in Dunbar. At about 06:00 hours on Wednesday 22nd October 2008 nurses attended on Mr McNeill to administer medication, including morphine sulphate, and prepare him for a bed bath. After about 30 minutes, when in course of being bathed, Mr McNeill’s condition deteriorated and he expired in the presence of nursing staff.


The Sheriff noted that from the evidence there could be little doubt that Mr McNeill’s care at Lennel House would have benefitted from better and more promptly implemented care plans and risk assessments; from being cared for by nursing staff who had the advantage of better managerial support; better induction procedures; better training especially in respect of pressure sores and the care of the elderly; better dissemination of information regarding policies and procedures; better access to specialist equipment; and from allocated time for communication as between staff on different shifts.

Focusing on Mr McNeill’s development of pressure sores, the risk of these developing would almost certainly have been reduced with earlier provision of special mattresses, cushions and organised and recorded positional changing. The Sheriff concluded from the evidence that the latest date when Lennel house nursing staff ought to have contacted the district nurse, or general practitioner, regarding Mr McNeill’s pressure sore would have been 4th June 2008. However, the Sheriff noted that in the interim period, key staff had changed at the nursing home and that following the death of Mr McNeill, procedures had been improved radically. For these reasons, the Sheriff considered it inappropriate to make any findings under the Act in terms of section 6(c) and (d).

FATAL ACCIDENT ENQUIRY INTO THE DEATH OF NASRULLAH KHALID, SHERIFF KENNETH ROSS, DUMFRIES SHERIFF COURT, 9TH MARCH 2011

DESCRIPTION

In terms of section 6(1)(a) of the Fatal Accidents and Sudden Deaths Inquiry (Scotland) Act 1976, the sheriff found that Nasrullah Khalid died within cell B/17 at H M Prison, Terregles Street, Dumfries on 23 November 2009 between the hours of 3.15pm and 4.55pm. In terms of section 6(1)(b), the cause of death was (a) Ischaemic Heart Disease (b) Coronary Artery Thrombosis and (c) Coronary Artery atherosclorosis. A formal determination was made under section 6(1)(c).


Background:
Mr. Khalid had suffered from a heart condition since 1996 when he had had a heart attack. The symptoms of his condition were stable angina, hypertension and atherosclerosis. For the three years prior to his death the deceased exercised regularly in Dumfries Prison gym. There was no medical reason why Mr. Khalid should not have participated in the exercise regime.


At about 1.50pm on 23rd November 2009 Mr. Khalid attended the prison gym as usual. About five minutes before the end of his routine the deceased experienced nausea and pains in the centre of his chest. He was examined by the duty nurse who concluded that he had suffered an angina attack. He was returned to his cell at 3.15pm and advised to rest and take his angina medication. At about 4.55pm Mr. Khalid was discovered lying on his bed with his eyes open and with vomit on his face. Officers commenced CPR and continued to do so until paramedics arrived about ten to fifteen minutes later. They took over the attempts to resuscitate Mr. Khalid which continued for a further twelve minutes. Throughout the procedure there was no response from Mr. Khalid. He was pronounced dead when the prison doctor arrived at 5.45pm.

Determination:

Under s.6(1)(c) the sheriff found that, in the examination of Mr. Khalid at the Prison gym, it should have been established if the chest pain of which he had complained had disappeared completely. In the absence of such a finding, the prison doctor should have been contacted and an ambulance called. However, to have done so would not have guaranteed Mr. Khalid’s survival. Nor would that survival have been a probability.

What is a community nurse?

Delivering care to the elderly, disabled and vulnerable patients who are unable to travel to a hospital or doctor’s surgery, community nurses are registered nurses who have undertaken degree level training as a specialist practitioner. This course focuses on four key aspects of nursing including clinical nursing, care and programme management, clinical practice development and clinical practice leadership.

Community nurse roles and responsibilities

A community nurse is responsible for performing many of the same duties as a district nurse. These include basic care (checking temperature, blood pressure and breathing), wound management, administering injections, setting up intravenous drips and assisting doctors with examinations and medical procedures. Community-based nurses are also able to provide vital information to clients, their families and carer/s, much in the same way as district nurses, while emergency support may also be required in cases when a patient is suffering cardiac arrest or a stroke. This demonstrates the many hats a community nurse must don in their line of care.

So what is the difference between community and district nurses?

In recent times, the terms district and community have become interchangeable as a way of describing areas of villages, towns and cities, meaning that there may be no difference between community and district nurses at all.

One Final Thing!

We would suggest that if you are contemplating instructing a Solicitor but you are a bit concerned about calling or emailing – for whatever reason, then write down every particular about what has happened to you. Put down dates and times and names of people involved. Then months from now when you change your mind and do contact a Solicitor – you will have the details. Many claims are never brought because the patients simply forget the details and are too embarrased to contact a lawyer to discuss. Get them on paper and if you never use them no harm done.

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About Us

The Law Med Medical Panel is an unincorporated association its members are clinical negligence accredited specialists.

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  • Tel 01904-914-989

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